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  #1  
Old 10-13-2020, 03:01 PM
Kale1278 Kale1278 is offline
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Default Pinpointing an object

To start off I am newer and very inexperienced, only have a few months under my belt.... I have search the how to, and didn't find anything. I have been having a issue with picking the right place to dig. When I finally find my target (usually trash) I have dug about a foot wide hole for a small object. Any suggestions on how to get closer? Thank you.
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  #2  
Old 10-13-2020, 03:16 PM
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DIGGER27 DIGGER27 is online now
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What kind of detector are you using and what kind of coil is on it...concentric or DD?

After a few months this shouldn't be an issue...but it is so answer the question and we can help.

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Old 10-13-2020, 03:17 PM
MuddyMo MuddyMo is online now
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Tell us what detector and coil you're using for the best answer.

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Old 10-13-2020, 03:26 PM
bowwinkles bowwinkles is offline
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After you get the initial signal, then select the pinpoint mode and make an X pattern over the suspected target. The point in the center of the X should be where your high dollar find will be. Most also have a hand pinpointer to again narrow the search down to an inch or so. By the way welcome aboard this forum. Hope this helped.
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Old 10-13-2020, 03:47 PM
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Find a spot in your yard with no targets. Throw a coin down and practice pinpointing. A hand pinpointer very helpful in locating the spot to dig.

Ken
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Old 10-13-2020, 04:04 PM
Kale1278 Kale1278 is offline
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Originally Posted by MuddyMo View post
Tell us what detector and coil you're using for the best answer.
Iím using a Garrett GTI 2500 and an Ace 250. Both are on stock coils, the Ace is oval a d the GTI is a 12Ē circle.

I do have a pinpoint but itís not useful until I get witching a few inches.

I will try throwing some coins on the ground too.
Thanks for your help
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Old 10-13-2020, 04:46 PM
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DIGGER27 DIGGER27 is online now
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Originally Posted by Kale1278 View post
Iím using a Garrett GTI 2500 and an Ace 250. Both are on stock coils, the Ace is oval a d the GTI is a 12Ē circle.

I do have a pinpoint but itís not useful until I get witching a few inches.

I will try throwing some coins on the ground too.
Thanks for your help
Confused.
Using a pinpoint feature is what you use to zero in on a target, accurately.
It pinpoints...hence the name.

When you get a target signal look at the area you think it's sitting and move your coil 10-12" away from that area then hit that button and slide the coil to that same spot until you get the loudest tone, lowest numbers or the most indicators in the case of that 250.
Pic 15 in this thread...
https://metaldetectingforum.com/showthread.php?t=2235

Similar with all detectors with a pinpoint.

If you are having trouble noticing that initial target area you need to practice what I call eye-coil coordination.
Stare at the area where you get those tones and make the best guess you can.
The center of most coils will give you the best most accurate information when you pass the coil over them.
For most it doesn't take long to learn this, if you are digging foot wide holes months after starting this hobby that is weird.

Could be you have a bad coil, I had one in my first detector and it was always 3-4" off the target no matter what I did but having two detectors with an even worse problem...don't think so.

Do the throw the coin things in a clear area of the ground and practice.
Then throw a piece of paper over those coins when you get used to where the coins are in the open without the paper.
In the ground targets should act similar.
Practice makes perfect!

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Last edited by DIGGER27; 10-13-2020 at 06:02 PM.
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  #8  
Old 10-13-2020, 05:36 PM
Kale1278 Kale1278 is offline
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Originally Posted by DIGGER27 View post
Confused.
Using a pinpoint feature is what you use to zero in on a target, accurately.
It pinpoints...hence the name.
I do use the pinpoint feature, but the radius is about a foot wide for small items. I also have a small handheld pointer, but in need to be very close 2-3" inches for it to work.

I live near the Garrett store, I may have to run over then and have my coils looked at.

Thank you all for the tips and ideas.
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  #9  
Old 10-13-2020, 06:02 PM
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Originally Posted by Kale1278 View post
I do use the pinpoint feature, but the radius is about a foot wide for small items. I also have a small handheld pointer, but in need to be very close 2-3" inches for it to work.

I live near the Garrett store, I may have to run over then and have my coils looked at.

Thank you all for the tips and ideas.
The radius when you hit the pinpoint button can be huge, all kinds of things could be under the coil all around that target and everywhere else making your pinpointer indicators go wild, just the dirt can do it too, THAT'S why you keep your eye on the target spot where you had the best most solid tone and sweep your coil to that area after you move it out and hit the pinpoint button then move it back in.
When you get the center of your coil over the area you had your eye on then you look for the loudest tone, most icons or lowest numbers when you get there with tiny little movements...in that small area ONLY.
Otherwise you are pinpointing everywhere and as you found out that won't work very well.
Same as in your handheld, it won't pinpoint accurately unless you get close, your detector coil won't either unless you get the center of the coil close to the target you are aiming to locate.

Take your detectors and coils to the Garrett store, ask them to SHOW you how to pinpoint with both your detectors, not just tell you but take you outside the store and show you.
If they won't do that you need to find another detector dealer but they probably will.
Then you will see how easy it actually is.

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  #10  
Old 10-14-2020, 11:04 AM
Dflan83 Dflan83 is offline
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I have never really had luck with a pinpoint feature on any detector that I've owned. I guess I dig around too much trash.

Easiest way to do it is to back off the object slowly while sweeping side to side till the sound drops off. Target will be in front of the top of the coil.

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  #11  
Old 10-14-2020, 11:37 AM
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Martin_V3i Martin_V3i is offline
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Originally Posted by Dflan83 View post
I have never really had luck with a pinpoint feature on any detector that I've owned. I guess I dig around too much trash.

Easiest way to do it is to back off the object slowly while sweeping side to side till the sound drops off. Target will be in front of the top of the coil.
That is what I do also. It takes a little finesse and patience, and it also can skew off. If the detector indicates the depth is shallow by signal tone strength, test pre -dig with the pin pointer. That saves a lot of time if it's a near surface coin. Honestly though. I still dig wide holes. You'll get better with time.

If your machine has a pin point function, there is a detune in method I use to "walk into" the exact spot. Hit the PP function button when you feel you are over the spot(while staying I PP.) It will detune and go quiet. Keep the coil on the ground and continue to repoint to look for more tone. If you happen to be over the exact location no new tone will appear. Repeat if tone still exists. SMALL movements. Recheck in discrimination at the last found, toneless spot to make sure you're not over a different target. It sounds hard but easy to grasp.

Last edited by Martin_V3i; 10-14-2020 at 11:55 AM.
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  #12  
Old 10-15-2020, 10:44 AM
bunkeru2k bunkeru2k is offline
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I stopped using the pinpoint function to actually pinpoint. If I think the coil is picking up multiple targets with bouncing signals, I will use the pinpoint from a few angles to see if it will actually pinpoint the multiple targets, then I tighten my sweeps over those spots in a 360 circle to see if I am getting numbers I want.

I thought the pinpoint function was actually pretty good on the Ace 300 that I had previously, but with that coil you might want to lift it up off the ground some since that signal is kind of cone shaped and might eliminate some of the addition trash.
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  #13  
Old 10-27-2020, 03:17 AM
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ToddB64 ToddB64 is offline
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Wink Pinpointing an object.

Hi Kale1278 !

If you haven't purchased a hand-held Pin-pointer yet, I recommend the RICOMAX selling on Amazon.com for $43.99.

After checking the specifications and reading some of the customer reviews, I was impressed and bought one for my brother.

Owning his own business doesn't allow much time to metal detect with his Tesoro Compadre, so I thought a pin-pointer would be good to save him time on hunts.

I had it shipped to my address so I could test it before giving to my brother and I was very pleased with the features and operation.

I've been metal detecting going on 15 years and have acquired several pin-pointers, so can say from experience that a pin-pointer is a great help to locate the exact spot to dig after getting a target signal from your metal detector, and reducing the size of the hole you dig.

Here's my method:

#1..After I get an initial signal, I "X' the target E-W and N-S, with my coil close to the ground until I have a reasonably good idea of the target spot.

#2..I carefully raise the coil straight up about 6", keeping it directly over the target, then reach under the coil with my other hand and press a Golf Tee in the ground over the spot. Believe me, it's easy to lose the target spot if not marked in some way and I like the Golf Tees !

#3..Then I use my pin-pointer to locate the exact target location around the Tee and adjust the Tee position if necessary before starting to recover the target.

#4..I use my Lesche Digger trowel to cut a 3" - 3-1/2" square flap (aka Trap door) on three sides only, leaving the forth side hinged, so that I can pry the flap up and lay it back. That way, after recovering the target and replacing any dug dirt back in the hole later on, I can easily close the flap back in position, press it down, ruffle the grass and make my dig unrecognizable. That avoids complaints about those %$@#! detectorists leaving the ground in deplorable-looking condition !

#5..I use my pin-pointer again to check the sides and underside of the flap and if the target isn't there, I begin removing dirt from the hole (and dumping it on a plastic drop cloth so the drop can be lifted and the dirt easily poured into the hole after target recovery.), and then checking the sides and bottom of the hole with the pin-pointer until I locate and remove the target.

Hope this helps.

ToddB64

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Last edited by ToddB64; 10-27-2020 at 03:25 AM. Reason: changing text.
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  #14  
Old 10-27-2020, 12:59 PM
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longbow62 longbow62 is offline
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I think the pinpoint feature on a detector is an okay thing for beginners, and I used it on my Whites XLT. When I bought a Nokta Impact I think I used it a little bit, but I soon found I did not need it. If you get a potential target you should swing over it from multiple directions. Doing so gives you much better info on the target, and basically pinpoints it at the same time.

In my opinion a lot of those new to detecting don't scrutinize targets enough before pinpointing and digging. All targets should be hit from multiple directions to get a better idea of what it is. Does the tone and numbers stay the same 360 degrees around it? By circling the target you get better info on it, plus you have basically pinpointed it at the same time. If I only swung one way over a target then went right to the pinpoint feature and dug it up I would be digging a lot more junk/trash.

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