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  #1  
Old 05-02-2021, 03:17 PM
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Default Ancient British coin.

In over 4 decades in this hobby this is only the second one I have found of type.

The coin is the same size as a 1 cent piece.

My thanks to a UK forum member for confirming the ID.

Thanks for looking.....Doug.

A Celtic or Ancient British coin of the Durotiges tribe

It dates from the Mid.1st century BC to Mid.1st century AD.

This coin is one of the most distinctive in ancient Britain due its rapid debasement. The disappearance of precious metals should be linked to the declining trade between south west England and Gaul.

Gaul was a region of Western Europe first described by the Romans. It was inhabited by Celtic tribes, encompassing present day France, Luxembourg, Belgium, most of Switzerland, and parts of Northern Italy, the Netherlands, and Germany, particularly the west bank of the Rhine.

These coins were rather simple and had no inscriptions, and thus no names of coin-issuers can be known, let alone evidence about monarchs or rulers. Nevertheless, the Durotriges presented a settled society, based in the farming of lands surrounded and controlled by strong hill forts that were still in use in 43 AD.

The field where it was found.


The coin.
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  #2  
Old 05-02-2021, 07:21 PM
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Doug, that is a great find. It won't win any contest for its looks but from a historical perspective it is a winner.
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  #3  
Old 05-02-2021, 07:56 PM
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Very cool !

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  #4  
Old 05-02-2021, 08:07 PM
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Doug congrats on the crazy old save. So I just read an article where they took a guys detector and destroyed it because he kept a few momentos of his find. Just where do they draw the line on what to report and what you can keep. A little confusing. Good luck, Mark

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  #5  
Old 05-03-2021, 09:51 AM
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Very happy for you Doug!! You have put in the time and research over the years and so you "earned" this historic find!

Your posts are more than just what you dig, they are so informative, and I learn so much from them that I wouldn't otherwise know.

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  #6  
Old 05-03-2021, 11:31 AM
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Spectacular! ugly can be beautiful! I do wonder if some have been thrown away because people did not know what they are. i threw away several Civil War cannon fuses because i was ignorant to what they were, new to the hobby, and no internet to research.

thats History with a capital H!

what metal is the coin?

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  #7  
Old 05-03-2021, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Jeff H View post
Doug, that is a great find. It won't win any contest for its looks but from a historical perspective it is a winner.
Thank you.

Originally Posted by Almann View post
Very cool !
Thank you.

Originally Posted by markinswpa View post
Doug congrats on the crazy old save. So I just read an article where they took a guys detector and destroyed it because he kept a few momentos of his find. Just where do they draw the line on what to report and what you can keep. A little confusing. Good luck, Mark
Thank you.

The legislation is quite straightforward in what constitutes 'potential treasure' under the meaning of the act. If in doubt ask.


Originally Posted by SeabeeRon View post
Very happy for you Doug!! You have put in the time and research over the years and so you "earned" this historic find!

Your posts are more than just what you dig, they are so informative, and I learn so much from them that I wouldn't otherwise know.
Thank you Ron.

Originally Posted by dixiedigger57 View post
Spectacular! ugly can be beautiful! I do wonder if some have been thrown away because people did not know what they are. i threw away several Civil War cannon fuses because i was ignorant to what they were, new to the hobby, and no internet to research.

thats History with a capital H!

what metal is the coin?
Thank you.

Metal is cast bronze which in itself is quire rare, most are of gold/silver.

A casual loss of its day from the surrounding history of the land.

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  #8  
Old 05-04-2021, 08:04 AM
Pete e Pete e is offline
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Originally Posted by Doug View post
In over 4 decades in this hobby this is only the second one I have found of type.

The coin is the same size as a 1 cent piece.

My thanks to a UK forum member for confirming the ID.

Thanks for looking.....Doug.

A Celtic or Ancient British coin of the Durotiges tribe

It dates from the Mid.1st century BC to Mid.1st century AD.

This coin is one of the most distinctive in ancient Britain due its rapid debasement. The disappearance of precious metals should be linked to the declining trade between south west England and Gaul.

Gaul was a region of Western Europe first described by the Romans. It was inhabited by Celtic tribes, encompassing present day France, Luxembourg, Belgium, most of Switzerland, and parts of Northern Italy, the Netherlands, and Germany, particularly the west bank of the Rhine.

These coins were rather simple and had no inscriptions, and thus no names of coin-issuers can be known, let alone evidence about monarchs or rulers. Nevertheless, the Durotriges presented a settled society, based in the farming of lands surrounded and controlled by strong hill forts that were still in use in 43 AD.

The coin.
Hi Doug,

Very interesting find and being fairly new to the hobby (about 3 years or so) it's not a coin I had heard of...What part of the UK was it found in if I may ask?

I am up in North Wales on mostly pasture, and any British coins pre Edward 1 are extremely rare...Roman coins while not exactly common do turn up more frequently, but no where as wide spread as in the southern and eastern parts of the UK...

Regards,

Peter
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Old 05-04-2021, 11:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Doug View post

The legislation is quite straightforward in what constitutes 'potential treasure' under the meaning of the act. If in doubt ask.
I've read some about that in these stories. It does seem pretty straightforward, and it also seems like is pretty fair to both the finder and the land owner. Like you said, it's not hard to ask, and it seems that the worst that happens is that the government has to pay you a fair price for a national treasure that can go in a museum.
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  #10  
Old 05-04-2021, 12:27 PM
kidlester kidlester is offline
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Hello,
It has to be incredible to hunt on ancient lands over there!
Congrats!
Tom
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  #11  
Old 05-04-2021, 04:19 PM
Pete e Pete e is offline
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Originally Posted by jordanmills View post
I've read some about that in these stories. It does seem pretty straightforward, and it also seems like is pretty fair to both the finder and the land owner. Like you said, it's not hard to ask, and it seems that the worst that happens is that the government has to pay you a fair price for a national treasure that can go in a museum.
There's alot of debate whether sums offered are "fair" although there is an appeal process. The other problem is that the process is often long winded often taking a few years to arrive at an outcome..

On very rare or otherwise important Finds, I can understand the need for the process, but in other cases not so much..

On a Brit forum somebody mentioned that they had found a thimble from the 1600's and because it's silver and over 300 years old, he declared it as per the law.

Now these thimbles are not super rare and are not nationally important, but to the Finder they are a lovely item to find, often on their bucket list.

In this case a local Museum has expressed an interest in acquiring it under the treasure process, so the Finder will end up being compensated say 75 which will then be ordered to be split with the landowner! And it's taken two years to get to this point and is still not completely resolved yet.
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  #12  
Old 05-04-2021, 05:23 PM
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Originally Posted by Pete e View post
Hi Doug,

Very interesting find and being fairly new to the hobby (about 3 years or so) it's not a coin I had heard of...What part of the UK was it found in if I may ask?

I am up in North Wales on mostly pasture, and any British coins pre Edward 1 are extremely rare...Roman coins while not exactly common do turn up more frequently, but no where as wide spread as in the southern and eastern parts of the UK...

Regards,

Peter
Hi Pete.

I'm located in Somerset but with the Dorset border just a few miles away which is where the coin would have originated from.

Google Iron Age coinage or Celtic.
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  #13  
Old 05-04-2021, 05:23 PM
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Originally Posted by kidlester View post
Hello,
It has to be incredible to hunt on ancient lands over there!
Congrats!
Tom
Thank you.
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  #14  
Old 05-04-2021, 06:43 PM
Pete e Pete e is offline
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Originally Posted by Doug View post
Hi Pete.

I'm located in Somerset but with the Dorset border just a few miles away which is where the coin would have originated from.

Google Iron Age coinage or Celtic.
Thanks Doug, I think up here they were still bartering sheep and turnips till about 1973!
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  #15  
Old 05-05-2021, 03:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Pete e View post
Thanks Doug, I think up here they were still bartering sheep and turnips till about 1973!

These are some examples of the local Durotiges tribes coins.

Link:

https://celticcoins.com/wp-content/u...s-captions.pdf
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  #16  
Old 05-06-2021, 10:39 PM
CallMeGrey CallMeGrey is offline
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Congrats on an awesome find! I really appreciate the history you also provided. Very interesting!

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  #17  
Old 05-07-2021, 01:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Pete e View post
Thanks Doug, I think up here they were still bartering sheep and turnips till about 1973!
Originally Posted by CallMeGrey View post
Congrats on an awesome find! I really appreciate the history you also provided. Very interesting!
Thank you.
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  #18  
Old 05-12-2021, 04:02 PM
jordanmills jordanmills is offline
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Originally Posted by Pete e View post
There's alot of debate whether sums offered are "fair" although there is an appeal process. The other problem is that the process is often long winded often taking a few years to arrive at an outcome..

On very rare or otherwise important Finds, I can understand the need for the process, but in other cases not so much..

On a Brit forum somebody mentioned that they had found a thimble from the 1600's and because it's silver and over 300 years old, he declared it as per the law.

Now these thimbles are not super rare and are not nationally important, but to the Finder they are a lovely item to find, often on their bucket list.

In this case a local Museum has expressed an interest in acquiring it under the treasure process, so the Finder will end up being compensated say 75 which will then be ordered to be split with the landowner! And it's taken two years to get to this point and is still not completely resolved yet.
Well, I see your point then. Okay so it has the potential to be good and fair...
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