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Old 02-05-2020, 03:05 PM
Dmar Dmar is offline
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Default What's the point of historic aerials if you shouldn't ask over the phone?

https://metaldetectingforum.com/showthread.php?t=160222

Secondly, like Goes4ever and the boyz recommend, I never, ever attempt to get permission over the phone, letter or email. Always in person. In my opinion if you try on the phone you are treated like a telemarketer, and via email or letter I am treated like spam. It is too easy for them to ignore you or say "No."
A lot of people will suggest using historic aerials to find places where houses used to be but in my experience it really is hard to get permission over the phone. I guess I could find the person's actual address pretty easily but I feel like that's taking it a little far? Idk.
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Old 02-05-2020, 03:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Dmar View post
https://metaldetectingforum.com/showthread.php?t=160222



A lot of people will suggest using historic aerials to find places where houses used to be but in my experience it really is hard to get permission over the phone. I guess I could find the person's actual address pretty easily but I feel like that's taking it a little far? Idk.
You’re just doing research and asking for permission. Nothing nefarious about that, bruddah.
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Old 02-05-2020, 04:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Dmar View post
.... in my experience it really is hard to get permission over the phone. I guess I could find the person's actual address pretty easily but I feel like that's taking it a little far? Idk.
I don't understand the point of your question. On the one hand, you're acknowledging that cold-calling people over the phone rarely ever works. Right ? But on the other hand, you're seeming to say that tracking down an address, and trying to meet them in person is "taking it too far" as well ?

At some point, you need to make a decision on whether or not you want to get permission to hunt a place. And yes : Cold-calls over the phone rarely work. You will just be treated as if you are a sales solicitor.
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Old 02-05-2020, 04:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Dmar View post
https://metaldetectingforum.com/showthread.php?t=160222



A lot of people will suggest using historic aerials to find places where houses used to be but in my experience it really is hard to get permission over the phone. I guess I could find the person's actual address pretty easily but I feel like that's taking it a little far? Idk.
I have tracked down people who own vacant lots, abandoned houses, and commercial/rental properties by using property records. Not once has somebody asked me how I got their info.

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Old 02-06-2020, 03:25 AM
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Originally Posted by ToySoldier View post
I have tracked down people who own vacant lots, abandoned houses, and commercial/rental properties by using property records. Not once has somebody asked me how I got their info.
Something which is, in any other context, rather scary if one ponders it long enough...

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Old 02-06-2020, 06:37 AM
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Some times you get lucky and find out it is government property
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Old 02-07-2020, 02:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Dmar View post
https://metaldetectingforum.com/showthread.php?t=160222



A lot of people will suggest using historic aerials to find places where houses used to be but in my experience it really is hard to get permission over the phone. I guess I could find the person's actual address pretty easily but I feel like that's taking it a little far? Idk.
I'm not sure what the direct correlation is between the technique used to research a location and the technique used to gain permission to hunt the location. To me, they are two distinctly different processes.

My personal technique for finding potential hunt sites is to use a combination of historic maps, historic aerials, local history books, ancient newspapers, knowledge from old timers, Google Earth, etc to discover and flesh out potential detecting locations. Typically, I might have a list of a handful or even a couple dozen potential properties before I even start to consider finding out who owns them.

To echo what others have said, cold-calling the owner of a potential permission site on the telephone has extremely low odds of success. There's a very high probability that you will be treated like a telemarketer - and in today's world that means you won't even get the opportunity to talk to them. When I get a phone call from a number I don't recognize or isn't in my "contacts" list, I simply don't answer and I let it go to voice mail - I'm pretty sure that's getting to be more and more of a common practice to avoid annoying telemarketing calls. So the property owner lets your call go to voice mail...now what? Do you leave a message? If so, now you're just talking at a machine. The "sales pitch" better be good, because chances are the person won't listen to the whole message before hitting "delete". And what if they don't call back? Do you call again, becoming a nuisance or a stalker? If you don't leave a message, how many times do you try again? Again, you risk becoming a pest or never breaking out of the "send unknown callers to voice mail" scenario - for me, if the unknown caller doesn't leave a message, it's a sure sign that it definitely wasn't important or worth my time!

But honestly, if all that wasn't enough to discourage phone calls for permission, isn't it much more difficult to try and secure a phone number than the address anyway?? When I'm ready to seek out a property owner for permission, I use a couple of different sources to get the owner name and address very quickly. First stop, especially if it's local, is the local county auditor's website. Many counties now have online mapping tools that allow you to access all of the information on a parcel that's considered public information, which includes a contact name and address - and you'll be amazed at how much information is considered public. A second tool I often use is a phone app called onX Hunt, which is fantastic when I'm on the road and I see a property that looks interesting - see my post here for more detail about onX Hunt.

Anyway, once I have the name and address, it's time to talk directly to the owner in person about gaining permission. Folks have varying techniques and spiels that they use when "door knocking", but the main point is, a face-to-face meeting allows you to avoid the problems outlined above when trying to use the phone. You'll get a definite "yes" or "no" - they can't shuttle you to voice mail! And just as importantly, folks are less likely to say "no" if they meet you, see your passion for the hobby, and you can get them excited about it by showing them some examples of the types of things you find.

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  #8  
Old 02-13-2020, 11:37 AM
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Originally Posted by AirmetTango View post
I'm not sure what the direct correlation is between the technique used to research a location and the technique used to gain permission to hunt the location. To me, they are two distinctly different processes.

My personal technique for finding potential hunt sites is to use a combination of historic maps, historic aerials, local history books, ancient newspapers, knowledge from old timers, Google Earth, etc to discover and flesh out potential detecting locations. Typically, I might have a list of a handful or even a couple dozen potential properties before I even start to consider finding out who owns them.

To echo what others have said, cold-calling the owner of a potential permission site on the telephone has extremely low odds of success. There's a very high probability that you will be treated like a telemarketer - and in today's world that means you won't even get the opportunity to talk to them. When I get a phone call from a number I don't recognize or isn't in my "contacts" list, I simply don't answer and I let it go to voice mail - I'm pretty sure that's getting to be more and more of a common practice to avoid annoying telemarketing calls. So the property owner lets your call go to voice mail...now what? Do you leave a message? If so, now you're just talking at a machine. The "sales pitch" better be good, because chances are the person won't listen to the whole message before hitting "delete". And what if they don't call back? Do you call again, becoming a nuisance or a stalker? If you don't leave a message, how many times do you try again? Again, you risk becoming a pest or never breaking out of the "send unknown callers to voice mail" scenario - for me, if the unknown caller doesn't leave a message, it's a sure sign that it definitely wasn't important or worth my time!

But honestly, if all that wasn't enough to discourage phone calls for permission, isn't it much more difficult to try and secure a phone number than the address anyway?? When I'm ready to seek out a property owner for permission, I use a couple of different sources to get the owner name and address very quickly. First stop, especially if it's local, is the local county auditor's website. Many counties now have online mapping tools that allow you to access all of the information on a parcel that's considered public information, which includes a contact name and address - and you'll be amazed at how much information is considered public. A second tool I often use is a phone app called onX Hunt, which is fantastic when I'm on the road and I see a property that looks interesting - see my post here for more detail about onX Hunt.

Anyway, once I have the name and address, it's time to talk directly to the owner in person about gaining permission. Folks have varying techniques and spiels that they use when "door knocking", but the main point is, a face-to-face meeting allows you to avoid the problems outlined above when trying to use the phone. You'll get a definite "yes" or "no" - they can't shuttle you to voice mail! And just as importantly, folks are less likely to say "no" if they meet you, see your passion for the hobby, and you can get them excited about it by showing them some examples of the types of things you find.
Very good post AirmetTango. Well thought out and explained.

Jim

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  #9  
Old 02-13-2020, 02:32 PM
Bank Fisher Bank Fisher is offline
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The reason why you show in person is so that the property owner can judge you and stereotype you. This is is a good thing! If you come across as a functional, productive member of society merely interested in history or old coins they will see you as harmless and say yes.

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