Friendly Metal Detecting Forums   Deteknix
List all sponsors

Go Back   Friendly Metal Detecting Forums > Everything About Finds > Help To ID My Finds

Notices

Reply
  
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-30-2013, 03:22 PM
mlitty's Avatar
mlitty mlitty is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Scotland County, North Carolin, USA
Posts: 646
Lightbulb Photographing Finds - Some Tips

Photographing tiny things up close is difficult, but part of the fun of sharing finds is showing off the details.

Whether you're using a professional camera or the camera on your phone, here are some tips for getting a photo that best displays your little find.

Lighting:
make sure there is adequate lighting and no glare. It might help to change the angle of the camera or prop the find up so that the light hits it at a different angle. Sometimes little details are more visible when the light hits the surface at a certain angle. Play with it.
Focus:
No one likes a blurry photo. It's hard on the eyes and frustrating to see.
  • Make sure the camera/phone is stable. rest it on a book or some stable object to keep it from moving or shaking when you press the button/screen to take the shot.
  • If your camera/phone has a "macro" mode, use it. The icon often looks like a little flower.
  • Even in macro mode, getting too close will result in a blurry photo. Instead of moving the camera closer, use your zoom. Move back far enough to get the find in focus and then use the camera to zoom in.
  • If your camera/phone has multiple resolutions and only digital zoom, set the resolution higher than you want for the final image and then use the digital zoom. Digital zoom is like cropping the photo before you take it. For example, 8mp settings taken with a lot of digital zoom might result in a 3mp final image.
Scale & Composition
What is behind your find? If it's lying on a surface, is there enough contrast? A dirty or corroded button on a white piece of paper is easier to see than that same object on a wood table.

Is your find a coin? Okay, we know how big those are, move along.

Something different? Include a known item for scale so we have something to compare it to when imagining its size. I often use a coin, but it might be a better idea to use a ruler as this is a multi-national forum and coins of different countries are different sizes.
Sketch
Is there an important detail that's difficult to see in the photo? Do a sketch and put it in the picture. You don't have to be Rembrandt, just do a quick line sketch of the detail on a clean white paper (no lined paper please).

We're not here to critique your drawing ability, but we do appreciate any effort to show us the cool and important details of your latest and greatest find. Especially if you're asking for help identifying the item.
Take Multiple angles and shots
You're all set up. You've considered your scale, lighting and focus, take an extra minute or two to get multiple shots at multiple angles.

Seeing a find from front, back, and sides gives a much fuller picture of your object. Seeing how it might be distorted, corroded, attached, etc. gives a fuller appreciation for your find.

Imagine a model coming down the runway. As he/she walks, you're waiting for the turn, to see the whole outfit from front, back, & sides. When shooting your find, give us that runway turn.
Preview and Edit
  • Take a look at your pictures before uploading them.
  • Delete the bad ones and re-shoot if needed.
  • Your software probably has an automatic color enhancement button in the menus somewhere. Try it and see if it improves the shot, if not, click "Edit > Undo" and stick with your original.
    If you don't have a simple photo editor, download IrfanView. It's free, easy to use, and safe. I've been using it for simple editing and preview for over a decade.
  • Crop you image down to include only the necessary space, your find and the scale object. With Irfanview, click and drag a rectangle around the area you want and press "ctrl" and "y" together. It's also in the menus. (don't forget to save).
Your photos will be up on the forums for a long long time. With a little practice, you can do all of this in around ten to fifteen minutes. Even if you do nothing else, getting the focus right and including a scale object will make a big difference in how your finds are enjoyed.

Especially if you're asking for identification help, take the time. People will be more inclined to spend a little of their time researching your find if they can see that you spent a little of your time giving them good visual information to work from.

Here's an example. It's not perfect, but it was one I posted recently when asking for help identifying a find.

__________________
Minelab X-Terra 505 || Bounty Hunter Tracker IV || Tinytec Deluxe
"Money doesn't grow on trees. It hides in dirt."


Last edited by mlitty; 07-31-2013 at 11:44 PM. Reason: more info
Reply With Quote


3 members found this post helpful.
  #2  
Old 03-29-2017, 04:45 PM
olfart's Avatar
olfart olfart is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: N.E. Texas near Texarkana
Posts: 79
Default

I use a "light tent" for photographing small articles where no glare and high detail are important. Just make a tall cone from any translucent material (I use frosted mylar) and cut a hole at the top just big enough for the camera lens. Then apply light to one or more sides of the cone, and the diffused light brings out the details. The on-camera flash even works OK with this cone setup.





Reply With Quote


  #3  
Old 03-29-2017, 08:47 PM
Coinshark's Avatar
Coinshark Coinshark is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Southern States
Posts: 691
Default Great tips!

Outstanding information!!! Great job on the post.

__________________
Rick --- US Coin specialist. (White's Classic ID)
Check out the group page "Ground Found Coins"
http://metaldetectingforum.com/group.php?groupid=235

Reply With Quote


  #4  
Old 03-29-2017, 10:51 PM
MattLock's Avatar
MattLock MattLock is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: St.Louis
Posts: 1,008
Default

Originally Posted by olfart View post
I use a "light tent" for photographing small articles where no glare and high detail are important. Just make a tall cone from any translucent material (I use frosted mylar) and cut a hole at the top just big enough for the camera lens. Then apply light to one or more sides of the cone, and the diffused light brings out the details. The on-camera flash even works OK with this cone setup.





Can you show us some pictures you took kind useing that methood ?

__________________
I know what the worlds gonna throw at me but will it like me ?
If you don't know history you don't know anything, your like a leaf who doesn't know he's part of a tree.

Reply With Quote


1 members found this post helpful.
  #5  
Old 03-30-2017, 12:35 AM
olfart's Avatar
olfart olfart is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: N.E. Texas near Texarkana
Posts: 79
Default

Oops. I thought I had included one in that post, but it disappeared. I'll try again.
Attached Images
  
Reply With Quote


  #6  
Old 03-30-2017, 07:08 AM
Gare Gare is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 49
Default

Very good posting I hope more people see this. Thanks again'
Reply With Quote


  #7  
Old 03-30-2017, 09:29 AM
Detector's Avatar
Detector Detector is offline
Supporter
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Dodge City KS
Posts: 9,006
Default

Good tips!

__________________
The real treasure is in the hunt....

Reply With Quote


  #8  
Old 03-30-2017, 10:20 AM
dlax dlax is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Massachusetts
Posts: 524
Default

Originally Posted by olfart View post
oops. I thought i had included one in that post, but it disappeared. I'll try again.
brilliant
Reply With Quote


  #9  
Old 03-30-2017, 10:58 AM
olfart's Avatar
olfart olfart is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: N.E. Texas near Texarkana
Posts: 79
Default

In another life, way back in the 20th Century when cameras required film, I was a photographer. Now it seems I'm a vast storehouse of useless information except for the techniques that carried over from film to digital.
Reply With Quote


  #10  
Old 03-30-2017, 06:10 PM
GLASSHOPPER1955's Avatar
GLASSHOPPER1955 GLASSHOPPER1955 is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Location: LaPorte County, Indiana
Posts: 1,658
Default

Originally Posted by olfart View post
In another life, way back in the 20th Century when cameras required film, I was a photographer. Now it seems I'm a vast storehouse of useless information except for the techniques that carried over from film to digital.
10-4 I loved 35MM slr's. A lot more fun than digital.

__________________
"Digging up the past - one bottle at a time since 1969"

Reply With Quote


  #11  
Old 03-30-2017, 07:49 PM
Crackerjack's Avatar
Crackerjack Crackerjack is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: The Flint Hills of Kansas.
Posts: 1,790
Cool

Originally Posted by olfart View post
In another life, way back in the 20th Century when cameras required film, I was a photographer. Now it seems I'm a vast storehouse of useless information except for the techniques that carried over from film to digital.
For some reason, when I read that, I heard it in Michael Caine's voice in my head. Hmmm, imagine that. You aren't British by any chance, are you?

__________________
Not in it "for the hunt"--I dig history.
http://detecting365.com/cleaning-away-history/
Teknetics EurotekPro w/ 8" coil, ProPointer AT, Lesche digging tool & Piranha.

Reply With Quote


  #12  
Old 03-30-2017, 07:53 PM
Crackerjack's Avatar
Crackerjack Crackerjack is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: The Flint Hills of Kansas.
Posts: 1,790
Smile

Originally Posted by GLASSHOPPER1955 View post
10-4 I loved 35MM slr's. A lot more fun than digital.
My first 35mm SLR I bought back in the 1970's at a hamfest. It was a Yashica TL, about 1968 vintage, I think. I used it until something broke or came loose inside, now it's probably prohibitively expensive to get fixed, even if I could find someone who knew how to fix it.

And technology marches on...

__________________
Not in it "for the hunt"--I dig history.
http://detecting365.com/cleaning-away-history/
Teknetics EurotekPro w/ 8" coil, ProPointer AT, Lesche digging tool & Piranha.

Reply With Quote


  #13  
Old 03-30-2017, 08:10 PM
olfart's Avatar
olfart olfart is offline
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2017
Location: N.E. Texas near Texarkana
Posts: 79
Default

Originally Posted by Crackerjack View post
For some reason, when I read that, I heard it in Michael Caine's voice in my head. Hmmm, imagine that. You aren't British by any chance, are you?
Nope! 100% Texan. Can you imagine it in a John Wayne voice?

My first 35mm SLR I bought back in the 1970's at a hamfest. It was a Yashica TL, about 1968 vintage, I think. I used it until something broke or came loose inside, now it's probably prohibitively expensive to get fixed, even if I could find someone who knew how to fix it.

And technology marches on...
Yes, Yashica made pretty good cameras, but they were not very durable. My first TLR was a YashicaMat. It was great until I went to work for UPI Newspictures in 1962, but it wore out pretty quickly thereafter. I replaced it with a Rollei 3.5 TLR.

73
KB5JDT

Last edited by olfart; 03-30-2017 at 08:12 PM. Reason: Oops...
Reply With Quote


  #14  
Old 03-30-2017, 09:04 PM
Crackerjack's Avatar
Crackerjack Crackerjack is offline
Elite Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: The Flint Hills of Kansas.
Posts: 1,790
Smile

Originally Posted by olfart View post
Nope! 100% Texan. Can you imagine it in a John Wayne voice?
Yes, most of it, but the last bit of the last sentence is a little long-winded for Duke's manner of speaking.

Yes, Yashica made pretty good cameras, but they were not very durable. My first TLR was a YashicaMat. It was great until I went to work for UPI Newspictures in 1962, but it wore out pretty quickly thereafter. I replaced it with a Rollei 3.5 TLR.

73
KB5JDT
I've inherited a Yashica TLR, forget the model, but I think it has something wrong with it, too. I don't use it anyway.

I was just a young pup when I got that SLR camera. Wasn't even a ham then, but interested in both photography and radio. Took Photography class in HS, (Mamiya SLR's) and became the teacher's assistant and the school photographer my senior year. Took photos for the school newspaper and some went into the yearbook. B&W only back then. Our film was surplus film, either military or film bulk roll ends, I forget now. Used to load our 35mm film cassettes from a bulk roll--Tri-X and Plus-X. Developed both the film and prints. DK-something or other chemical developer (Dektol?), acetic acid stop bath and then fixer. Lots of fun back then. Should have made it a profession, but being the school photographer made it work, and it wasn't fun anymore, and I lost interest.

__________________
Not in it "for the hunt"--I dig history.
http://detecting365.com/cleaning-away-history/
Teknetics EurotekPro w/ 8" coil, ProPointer AT, Lesche digging tool & Piranha.

Reply With Quote


Reply


Tags
find, howto, identification, photo, tip

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Photographing coin Tips YARDBYRD Forum Help & Announcements 82 12-07-2016 11:19 AM
Photographing coins? mws_1984 Cleaning Your Finds 30 07-26-2011 10:07 AM
Good cheap camera for photographing finds CrazySlasher Metal Detector Accessories 5 07-07-2010 10:35 PM
Photographing coins Blueonceagain What's the Value? 11 01-22-2010 10:06 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.