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  #1  
Old 07-24-2019, 07:26 AM
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TrenchKnife TrenchKnife is offline
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Default How big is what I can't see?

Hey Detectorists,

how do I determine the size of an object? I've have had trouble with sizing an object before I dig it. are there any tricks to it?


I wondered if using my swing pattern could do it, I wondered if the volume of the target would help but my guesses are usually off. I'm using the Nox 800 and have used no others (I know, call me a newbie).

what are your techniques to determine size?

does it even matter?

-TK

PS: if you know of any threads on this please point me to them.

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  #2  
Old 07-24-2019, 07:34 AM
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You try try raising the coil a 6-8 inches over your target and see if it disappears. That would help indicate if it's a smalled object. If you're still getting hits a foot or in the air you probably have a small car or treasure chest under the coil. I don't use a NOX but with the ATP in pinpoint you can nearly trace the size of the object in the ground to get a general idea.
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  #3  
Old 07-24-2019, 08:38 AM
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Originally Posted by TrenchKnife View post
Hey Detectorists,

how do I determine the size of an object? I've have had trouble with sizing an object before I dig it. are there any tricks to it?.......
Depth and conductivity are in direct relationship with each other as far as being able to determine size. The depth gauge on most detectors assumes everything is a coin sized target. So, something much smaller than a coin is always going to read deeper than it really is. Something much bigger than a coin will always read shallower.

Collect together some good targets and some junk that you've dug. Put them down in various arrangements on a surface that doesn't have any nails or rebar in it. Experiment and make mental notes. Shorten up the length of your detector to make it easier to swing a few inches over the targets. Once you get a feel for the relative size and sound of each target, put some close together to see what happens. Set some higher than others on wood blocks or plastic containers. Put a quarter under a wood block and set a nail on top of it, etc...

There's nothing like the positive feedback of digging good targets. Eventually you'll know "that's a coin-sized target".

Pinpointing--waggle method or using the pinpointing feature--should also give you some indication of size. But, again, a deeper target could seem a bit smaller than it actually is. One of the first things you should notice is when you are over a piece of pipe.

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Old 07-27-2019, 08:55 PM
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If it is somewhat close to the surface you can trace with your pinpointer.

you can also use the heel/toe method to find the outside dimensions of deeper objects.

This is where you swing the front of your detector towards you until you lose the signal of the front (toe). Then do the same thing but away from you until the signal disappears off the bottom (heel) of your detector. You can rotate 90 degrees and repeat to find the other sides width.

Good for not digging wires, pipes and big cans.

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Old 07-27-2019, 09:29 PM
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Originally Posted by maxxkatt View post
you can also use the heel/toe method to find the outside dimensions of deeper objects.
I found that same technique in another thread and asked on it. I also posited that* the size can be literally determined with a bunk equation. I use left to right similar to your front to back to find my "X" patern. turns out mine is more "+" .

With some good ol' fashioned toe-heel grease, could we actually call a size before we dig ... and be right often enough to look like we know what we are doin?

* http://metaldetectingforum.com/showthread.php?t=274735

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  #6  
Old 07-27-2019, 09:34 PM
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You need to lay coins on the ground or bury them to get an idea of how deep you can detect them. Also take note of how loud the signal is as you swing. Other than surface coins the deeper they are the less loud the beep is going to be.

I slowly raise the coil while swinging over the target to gauge it's true size. Look at the shovels and see how many you are getting. Let's say your getting dime numbers on the V.I.D. 26-28ish and 4 shovels on on the meter. A dime 4 shovels is going to be more quite than one at the surface. If it's louder than normal for a coin sized object that's a size hint. Swing over it slowly raising the coil. You are going to lose that signal pretty quick as you raise the coil up if it's really a dime that already shows on the meter to be 4" deep. The more experience you have with the 800 the better you will get at being to estimate target size.

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  #7  
Old 07-27-2019, 10:59 PM
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Originally Posted by longbow62 View post
You need to lay coins on the ground or bury them to get an idea of how deep you can detect them. Also take note of how loud the signal is as you swing. Other than surface coins the deeper they are the less loud the beep is going to be.

I slowly raise the coil while swinging over the target to gauge it's true size. Look at the shovels and see how many you are getting. Let's say your getting dime numbers on the V.I.D. 26-28ish and 4 shovels on on the meter. A dime 4 shovels is going to be more quite than one at the surface. If it's louder than normal for a coin sized object that's a size hint. Swing over it slowly raising the coil. You are going to lose that signal pretty quick as you raise the coil up if it's really a dime that already shows on the meter to be 4" deep. The more experience you have with the 800 the better you will get at being to estimate target size.
That is what I do.
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  #8  
Old 09-06-2019, 04:10 PM
Emwonk Emwonk is offline
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Originally Posted by TrenchKnife View post
Hey Detectorists,

how do I determine the size of an object? I've have had trouble with sizing an object before I dig it. are there any tricks to it?

what are your techniques to determine size?

does it even matter?

-TK
.

Clues to size are determined by height above ground and width of target.

Size matters because valuable stuff tends to be coin or ring sized. And generally but not always deeper. Unusual stuff that's interesting can be a lot bigger. (Old brass lock or copper arrowhead, for example.) It's impossible to to be sure until you see it but a target you can still hear clear with the coil 8 inches off the ground is bigger than a coin. If the target is 12 inches wide - for example -- it's not a coin either, and usually junk. Not always.

On the other hand, the top of an aluminum can or mason jar lid 12 inches down can sound like a nice coin.

The best you ever get is a clue until you see it.
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  #9  
Old 09-14-2019, 10:24 AM
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Run your detector over something small, say a coin, and then run it over something bigger like a squashed can. See if you can notice a difference in the 'length' of the signal. I use a ctx3030 and cans, always make a longer (or larger) signal. Those types of signals I usually ignore in parks, however at old house sites I sometimes dig them (could be a silver spoon or something like that)

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  #10  
Old 09-14-2019, 12:55 PM
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Size of the target at different heights of the coil, sound, volume, all kinds of senses are in play when sizing targets or depth...or both.
Experience helps a lot in all of this.

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