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  #1  
Old 11-15-2017, 07:28 PM
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Default A few old growth logging relics

Found part of this long two man saw today, and axe a few days ago. Dug in area of old photo. Thanks for looking.Some of those huge cedar logs were cut up into smaller size called shingle bolts.

From high up on the mountains they were put in wooden flumes and floated down by river stream water down to the mills on our waterfront. Or in really early pioneer days loaded on to sail ships. Bottom picture is a shingle bolt flume, more then a few people have died riding down those flumes.

Have found many of the double edge axes. Only one saw, but know where there is another.

Only in a few rare places can we still see parts of these wooden flumes. Does anyone know what the 4th man on top is holding?

oj/bc ps in wrong forum
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Last edited by Pulltabby; 11-15-2017 at 08:03 PM.
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Old 11-15-2017, 08:13 PM
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The 4th man is holding a hand operated auger for drilling holes

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Old 11-15-2017, 08:21 PM
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Originally Posted by normx2 View post
The 4th man is holding a hand operated auger for drilling holes
Do you know why they drill, maybe to fasten a hook/chain?

thanks
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Last edited by Pulltabby; 11-15-2017 at 08:38 PM.
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Old 11-16-2017, 11:12 AM
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Some of those trees were so large they drilled a hole and set off a charge to split them.
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Old 11-16-2017, 11:24 AM
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Cool finds and pics!

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Old 12-02-2017, 12:02 PM
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Thanks for the great photos and congratulations on some awesome finds reminiscent of our own old growth logging days in the Pacific Northwest.
In years past you could go into the woods and find parts of massive chain saws and huge logging chains.
Today we still find memorabilia from those days, mainly the tiny metal tags used to track Spotted Owls and shotgun shell head stamps from the rounds used to shoot them.

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Old 12-02-2017, 01:37 PM
GeneralQuarters GeneralQuarters is offline
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Pulltabby, It's great to see your photos of the old logging industry. As in BC, we in Washington find relics of these times. Sometimes I just go out in remote areas in the woods and find cool relics. Coin drops mainly. Thanks again!

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Old 12-03-2017, 01:05 AM
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Thanks, my pleasure to post the pictures... hh

oj/bc
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Old 12-03-2017, 06:33 AM
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Cool pics. It's still dangerous work, but nothing compared to how it used to be.
My Grandfather was a logger when chainsaws came on the scene. He didn't like using them because according to him they attract rattlesnakes.
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Old 12-03-2017, 02:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Scooterjim View post
Cool pics. It's still dangerous work, but nothing compared to how it used to be.
My Grandfather was a logger when chainsaws came on the scene. He didn't like using them because according to him they attract rattlesnakes.
Had to be tuff being a logger that's for sure. Thanks for looking.
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Old 12-03-2017, 02:45 PM
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I've been involved with tree work for 25 years, and have always admired the pioneers of the industry...

Congrats on the finds, cool thread..

<)))>{
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Old 12-03-2017, 06:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Ice Scratcher View post
I've been involved with tree work for 25 years, and have always admired the pioneers of the industry...

Congrats on the finds, cool thread..

<)))>{

Thanks..My province and city is surrounded by logging history...
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Old 12-04-2017, 10:54 AM
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Don't know where I put it but I remember finding a double-headed axe on a hill top in Chattanooga, that measured about 12" across. That sucker was heavy!

Congrat's on recovering history! HH

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Old 12-06-2017, 09:37 AM
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No Fat Boys back then.
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