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-   -   How much should a ring move in the wet sand (https://metaldetectingforum.com/showthread.php?t=251990)

skateteacher 09-17-2017 08:50 PM

How much should a ring move in the wet sand
 
I'm looking for a ring that was lost at low tide this morning (-0.4). It was a women's gold wedding ring. I'm curious what is considered the natural ebb and flow. There are no storms or large swells just normal high/low tide. I know there is nothing exact about this just looking for those with personal experience.
Thanks!


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zeemang 09-17-2017 09:01 PM

If it was lost at low tide it is under water right now, hard to say how far it could have traveled by now, ten feet or a hundred...

skateteacher 09-17-2017 09:07 PM

Right. Hence my question. I've been more of a dirt fisher rather than sea dweller so I'm looking to improve my education as I expand. I have a decent evening low tide coming up on Friday and I'm going to hit it then. Thanks for dropping some knowledge on me.

lawsonland 09-17-2017 09:23 PM

Depends a lot on the size/weight and the water action.
Here's 2 examples I had.
I had a lady come up to me says she lost her fathers ring (given to her after he died). I found it a couples hours later about 2-3 blocks north of where she went in the water. It was a small thin band.
Another person lost a ring which I found the next day within 15 or so feet of where they thought they dropped it. It was a very heavy band.

Probably not much help, good luck

skateteacher 09-17-2017 09:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lawsonland (Post 2830934)
Depends a lot on the size/weight and the water action.
Here's 2 examples I had.
I had a lady come up to me says she lost her fathers ring (given to her after he died). I found it a couples hours later about 2-3 blocks north of where she went in the water. It was a small thin band.
Another person lost a ring which I found the next day within 15 or so feet of where they thought they dropped it. It was a very heavy band.

Probably not much help, good luck

Thank you. It is a great help actually and I appreciate you taking the time.

ScubaDetector 09-17-2017 10:32 PM

Rings have a hole in the middle. They don't move except DOWN. There is nothing the waves or tides can push against but the side. No surface area. Should be right where it was lost.

skateteacher 09-17-2017 10:38 PM

Thanks Scuba. Hopefully I'll get to post the pics:D

romyrome 09-17-2017 10:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skateteacher (Post 2830918)
I'm looking for a ring that was lost at low tide this morning (-0.4). It was a women's gold wedding ring. I'm curious what is considered the natural ebb and flow. There are no storms or large swells just normal high/low tide. I know there is nothing exact about this just looking for those with personal experience.
Thanks!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

it all depends, i was pondering this with my buddy yesterday while surf fishing i would cast a 1 ounce sinker into the surf and it would travel so fast north in the surf, faster than i could walk to follow it, so if a one ounce lead object does that what does a 2-9 gram gold ring do ? I imagine the same thing :?: we said we were gonna try to walk the beach this way and follow the sinker til it stops and detect that area :yes: its a experiment that i can only learn from right :?:

Steve 09-18-2017 12:01 AM

I've found that when people lose rings they almost always mis identify the spot. Even roped in swimming sections they are almost always off. Most rings won't move unless there are massive waves moving everything. The higher k the lower chance of movement. Ring design also plays a part. Is there a section of the ring that can get rolled with the waves... some signet rings are able to do this

OBN 09-18-2017 01:03 AM

Here some rings move and some don't.. remember every location is different.

Up in the rivers I hunt rings are lost and they just set and sink. Out in the bay it's a different story. Sand moves, it moves rocks, shells, and rings. I have a few spots that are natural traps. 2015 One of these spots gave me 20 plus gold rings just by checking it every few months.

At the ocean on the east coast it's the same, I think the furthest I have heard was one my friend Mark / OCC returned. Class ring moved 35 blocks in 20 years. Then I found one that was lost on thursday and I found it the following monday and it had not moved at all. It was lost on the upper part of the slope, so it stayed right where it was lost. Conditions control..Good Luck

dewcon 09-18-2017 05:51 AM

The thing we deal with a lot is they THINK they lost it right here. But in reality..... thats when they noticed it was gone. Joes right..... depends on location and water movement. Rings with diamonds especially smaller rings are harder to ID and will "parachute" or travel on the stone with water movement. Heavier rings........ will be right close and will get buried before they move to much without significant water movement.

Dew

DaviDs 09-18-2017 09:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by skateteacher (Post 2830918)
I'm looking for a ring ...I'm curious what is considered the natural ebb and flow.

I found a ring that had been lost in the water (Florida beach) 12 months prior. I searched the area repeatedly over several months. After a big storm erroded 6-7 feet of sand, I found it in almost the exact location the gal claimed to have lost it. For that scenario, Scuba is spot on!

At another Florida beach, I searched for a man's ring. He had pictures showing where he lost it, but after several storm delays, I found it by happenstance a whopping 3 blocks away. For this scenario, OBN is spot on.

Best of luck.


Quote:

Originally Posted by ScubaDetector (Post 2830979)
Rings have a hole in the middle. They don't move except DOWN. There is nothing the waves or tides can push against but the side. No surface area. Should be right where it was lost.

Quote:

Originally Posted by OBN (Post 2831033)
Here some rings move and some don't.. remember every location is different. ...At the ocean ...I think the furthest I have heard was one my friend Mark / OCC returned. Class ring moved 35 blocks in 20 years. I found one ...it had not moved at all.


Caribbeanson 09-18-2017 10:51 AM

I think the best thing to do is get out as soon as possible. If you could go before Friday then I would. Everyone else touched on the scenarios well. A straight band probably wouldn't move much, one of the large dinner or knuckle rings especially silver might get thrown around like crazy depending on the wave action at your beach.

I think if you have a beach with 6-8ft of soft sand and seasonal erosion of 3-5+ ft that throws around sand, rocks, even boulders around then there's a good chance everything is mixed up like a silty milkshake :)

imalookin2 09-18-2017 08:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by romyrome (Post 2830984)
it all depends, i was pondering this with my buddy yesterday while surf fishing i would cast a 1 ounce sinker into the surf and it would travel so fast north in the surf, faster than i could walk to follow it, so if a one ounce lead object does that what does a 2-9 gram gold ring do ? I imagine the same thing :?: :

Your sinker moved because the LINE was being pulled by the current. It would not move if it dropped with no line. Rings have a hole. They will sink down. Surf pushes and pulls on the sand every day. A ring will move but not like your sinker.

Kapi 09-19-2017 08:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ScubaDetector (Post 2830979)
Rings have a hole in the middle. They don't move except DOWN. There is nothing the waves or tides can push against but the side. No surface area. Should be right where it was lost.

Yep! Even years later!

romyrome 09-20-2017 12:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by imalookin2 (Post 2831438)
Your sinker moved because the LINE was being pulled by the current. It would not move if it dropped with no line. Rings have a hole. They will sink down. Surf pushes and pulls on the sand every day. A ring will move but not like your sinker.

shoot well duh that makes sense :laughing: i found a big ol steel ring looking thing hahahha i guess it way a ring idk but i am gonna test this with this ring im gonna toss it into the surf near a tower and come back two days later and look for it and see where it goes ? :?:

Slimpickuns 09-20-2017 03:59 AM

A gold ring should move as much as it needs to to end up underneath my coil :D

dewcon 09-20-2017 06:16 AM

Sorry, but i dont agree, everything moves to shore given the right conditions. Ringer finders hunted for a ring for over a week...... i found it more than 25 yards South. Anytime you can get sand moving with any volume other things will move. It may initially get buried or sink.... but build up of small sand bars cause a lot of digging to the front of them. So ... the area you are hunting can make a difference.

FelixtheCat 09-20-2017 08:43 AM

Another issue that is relevant is sand type/conditions. There are certain areas within surf areas where the sand is softer and mushier and not as compact. Under those conditions, the ring would sink relatively quickly and keep going until it gets stopped by relative density in harder, denser, more compact conditions.

Caribbeanson 09-20-2017 11:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FelixtheCat (Post 2832060)
Another issue that is relevant is sand type/conditions. There are certain areas within surf areas where the sand is softer and mushier and not as compact. Under those conditions, the ring would sink relatively quickly and keep going until it gets stopped by relative density in harder, denser, more compact conditions.

I agree. In the end it just comes down to putting in the time and patience to know your particular beach and what tickles her gold fancy :D:yes:


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