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-   -   Relic hunting basics? (https://metaldetectingforum.com/showthread.php?t=252512)

HunterGA 10-02-2017 07:42 AM

Relic hunting basics?
 
So I get that to go relic hunting one has to find the location (old homestead etc), I think I have that covered in my area of Georgia. What are some general techniques now that I have decent detectors on hand (safari and f75)? Dig pretty much everything including what id's as a pull tab? I am all in as I don't want to leave any great pieces of history in the ground, what areas of a property stand out as potential good places to hunt? Any specific settings of either detector especially useful in relic hunting?

Gauntlet 10-02-2017 07:54 AM

Dig it all. Specific areas all depends, do you know which way the house was oriented? Clotheslines? Large trees? Out buildings? Is this currently farm ground, if so years of cultivation can spread finds in all directions from where they once laid.

All that said, a "generic" way to begin is to start where you think the center of the house was, and work outward in all directions. Note where you start making multiple finds.

Semtav 10-02-2017 10:50 PM

Biggest thing is to find out what pieces of rusty tin sound like. they can ruin your day if the place is trashy with them. I dig anything above iron that has a consistent tone. except stinking rusty tin.

Curbdog 10-03-2017 10:52 AM

For me, I already see the absolute need for a smaller (8x6 SEF on the list) for the Safari. I'm still learning it but I like what I see so far. For now I avoid the targets that ring up as a 40. I've heard and seen that it's a rusty iron something. It has to do with the iron wrap around.

If I was purely relic-hunting (digging ALL non-iron) I'd have another Deeptech machine. They only disc. up to foil and they do an uncanny job at iron in any form. better than any other machine I've had. The "Deep" in Deeptech should let you know something about their machines as well!

HH

Tpmetal 10-03-2017 12:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Semtav (Post 2837425)
Biggest thing is to find out what pieces of rusty tin sound like. they can ruin your day if the place is trashy with them. I dig anything above iron that has a consistent tone. except stinking rusty tin.

Gotta dig that tin though, many signals underneath of it.

Tpmetal 10-03-2017 12:53 PM

i basically only hunt cellar holes. Here is what I have learned. Small dd coil is essential, I hear it's better if its eliptical (mines not). Not only for target seperation but for swing space in over grown sites. You can always go back later with the bigger coil and start into the deeper stuff, but most of that is covered by other signals above it, so gotta dig them first anyway to even hear the other ones. Second is work in front of the house hardest between it and the road(or what would have been the road.), as well as in between the foundation and well. 3rd is just keep going back and digging as much as you can, the good stuff often does not show up until its been hunted a few times and cleaned up.

HunterGA 10-03-2017 01:01 PM

What I am doing now is trying to locate an old map and historic photos of my area of Georgia, as i have access to some pretty old historic homesteads. One had a pharmacy and another a blacksmith. I suppose an old bar would be a great one too. O e more question I had, many say to suppress iron, but aren't there some interesting iron relics or would they all be in pretty bad shape from rust in this Georgia red dirt? Many thanks

T-Man 10-03-2017 02:53 PM

Depending on where I'm hunting I'll typically try to avoid small & very large iron. That said I've always got some enjoyment digging the midsized signals, if you get a good iron hit that is too large for a nail and small enough to not be a buried tire rim you may wind up pulling out horseshoes, axe heads etc. Not any real value for them but always cool (at least to me) to find them.

Semtav 10-03-2017 03:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tpmetal (Post 2837580)
i basically only hunt cellar holes. Here is what I have learned. Small dd coil is essential, I hear it's better if its eliptical (mines not). Not only for target seperation but for swing space in over grown sites. You can always go back later with the bigger coil and start into the deeper stuff, but most of that is covered by other signals above it, so gotta dig them first anyway to even hear the other ones. Second is work in front of the house hardest between it and the road(or what would have been the road.), as well as in between the foundation and well. 3rd is just keep going back and digging as much as you can, the good stuff often does not show up until its been hunted a few times and cleaned up.

your cellar holes must be different than ours. ours have the ground all sluffed off on the sides and most of the original cellar floor is under 2-3 feet of dirt. Usually where all the junk and trash accumulates. Need a backhoe to have any luck.

Tpmetal 10-03-2017 03:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Semtav (Post 2837644)
your cellar holes must be different than ours. ours have the ground all sluffed off on the sides and most of the original cellar floor is under 2-3 feet of dirt. Usually where all the junk and trash accumulates. Need a backhoe to have any luck.

nope i just hunt around the holes mostly. Ill swing inside of them but haven't found much inside.

roaddust66 12-24-2017 11:36 AM

georgia
 
smaller sharpshooter coil is a must around an old home place. Don't forget to hunt the fields. When I get a signal , I always kick and scruff the ground before digging to insure target is not on the surface and I am wasting my time by digging a hole. Watch out for wells. You could accidently come upon one without knowing its there and fall right in like I almost did once. Snakes and wasp love old homesteads. Never go alone. Remember copperheads den up. If you see one , there could be dozens around you. Its happened to me so if you see a snake there could be others right there looking at you. Soldiers liked lots of nice clean water so if you find a spring , look for the high ground. The state of Georgia owned the Western & Atlantic Railroad. Soldiers camped and guarded every single railroad bridge. Good Luck !


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